BERRY GALETTE, Rustic, Free-Form and Delicious

“J’aime la galette, savez-vous comment? Quand elle est bien faite, avec du beurre dedans.”

The Berry Galette, up close and personal. The Tuesday with Dorie Baking with Julia recipe choice for this week.

 

French school children sing a silly, nonsensical tune about this week’s TWD/BWJ recipe choice, Berry Galette.  Translated, the lyrics are,“I like galette, do you know how? When it is made well, with butter inside.”

This afternoon, as I was putting together what I considered a simple recipe, “est bien faite” , the “made well “ part, became a problem. My dough wasn’t coming together for me. Not at all.  Frustrated, I combined the two small disks into one and tossed them back in the refrigerator.

 

What started as two, wrapped tightly and chilled for two hours, failed to live up to their task. Two became one and were returned to the fridge to “chill out”.

 

Next, I’ll even admit pulling out my “if all else fails” emergency back-up, hidden in my freezer: Trader Joe’s Pie Crust. Just couldn’t do it. Instead, I walked around our community’s Loop ( it was 106 degrees), huffed and puffed and returned to try again.

 

Thought about it. Seriously. Considered it. Seriously. Couldn’t do it.

 

My second attempt was successful and I managed to roll out one 11” circle that was about 1/8” thick, discarding the rest of the dough. After transferring it to a parchment-lined jelly roll pan, I spread blackberries, raspberries and blueberries, within two inches of the border. Then I sprinkled sugar, poured honey, and sliced butter over the fruit. I wrapped and pleated the dough to seal in the fruit (hopefully).

 

In the oven, pleated and wrapped.

 

Although my galette sprung a leak, my sleuthing suggests it’s quite difficult to not have seepage. Even master baker and cookbook author Flo Braker, who shared this recipe with Julia, believes a juicy galette is a well-baked galette as shown in her photo on pages 344-345 of our cookbook, Baking with Julia.

 

Whoops.

 

The only change I made to this recipe was substituting one-half of the all-purpose flour with whole wheat flour. To add more flavor, a small amount of Licor 43 could be poured on the fruit mix but I choose not to add more liquid this time. To see the full recipe go to the websites of our hosts this week:  Lisa,  http://tomatothymes.blogspot.com, who is from Ohio and Andrea,  http://kitchenlioness.blogspot.com , who now lives in Germany.  Andrea is also my colleague as a member of French Fridays with Dorie. To see if others huffed or puffed this week,  go to http://tuesdayswithdorie.wordpress.com

 

Served warm, with a scoop of ice cream, Berry Galette is very tasty.

Comments

  1. says

    Oh my – we had a couple of days in Vancouver this weekend that ranged up to 29º (around 84º in Fahrenheit) and the heat wave was all over the news.

    Your galette looks beautiful, leakage or no.

  2. says

    Spilling is necessary when making a berry pie, it always happens and adds to the charm. I complain about the summer recipes with winter fruits, but making dough with those temperatures is just as annoying. You guys can complain all you want and blame everything on the heat. Love the final plate with the ice cream and fresh berries!

  3. says

    I tried to find Licor43 in Ames’ Hy Vee…to no avial! I found this dough awfully fiddly without a lot of extra flour, but the end result was tasty. I’m posting on Wed. due to another challenge :)

    • Mary says

      Lizzy, I have a big smile on my face after reading that you couldn’t find Licor 43 in Ames at the local Hy-Vee. Liz, you’re in Iowa. I loved living in Ames, where I earned my graduate degree and taught at Iowa State. A wonderful University town. But, Licor 43 at the Hy-Vee or any other grocery store there? No.

  4. says

    Leakage was almost mandatory. That being said, your galette looks delightfully scrumptious (especially with that scoop of ice cream waiting to go all melty on top of things).

    The heat made this dough a bit fussy to work with (it was in the 90′s even up where I live) & I refused to turn on my oven (so took it to the grill again).

    • Mary says

      Thanks, Cher, I realize that “heat” problem now. Daughter Melissa told me that it’s just too hot here (in Las Vegas) to be trying to work with pastry dough. The Rolling out,she means. Cold marble and a cold marble rolling pin, I no longer have. Also, I have never worked with Whole Wheat flour before and didn’t realize I had to have more moisture rather than less, which she also explained. (All this is explained very nicely to me, I might add, so she doesn’t “hurt Mom’s feelings”. I think when I can get my hands on some good apples and cooler temps, I will try this douigh again.

  5. says

    Good for you for prevailing. I found the dough very sticky even after a few hours in the fridge and it was only about 90 degrees outside. Maybe I should have stuck it in the freezer.

  6. says

    Mary, A perfectly beautiful galette! You made me laugh when you wrote that you almost used pre-made pie crust!! There have been many times I was tempted to resort to the pre-made crust myself! It could be so terribly frustrating!! The hot weather defiantly plays havoc with the dough.
    Delicious looking!!

  7. says

    Mary ~ I laughed when I saw the picture of TJ’s pie dough! Me, I would have used it. Good for you for sticking to your guns and having success. Looks mighty good!

  8. says

    Well, your last pictures speaks aloud: “look how delicisou and beautiful I am…. doesn’t matter how I got there!’”.

    We loved this recipe and it’s definitely a keeper

  9. says

    Mary, running a day or two late with my comments here, I believe your Galette looks wonderful, especially with all the love you put into baking it and with that dreadful heat.

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